Marine Scotland

  • An investigation in Scottish coastal waters –  Ocean Acidification Week 2021

    15th September 2021 by

    Figure 2 Examples of calcifying plankton monitored in Scottish waters - coccolithophore, pteropod and bivalve larvae

    By absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere the chemistry of the ocean changes and seawater becomes more acidic - this is known as Ocean Acidification.

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  • Assessing Plankton in the UK

    3rd February 2020 by

    Two scientists from Marine Scotland Science (MSS), Dr Eileen Bresnan and Dr Margarita Machairopoulou, have been involved in the first ever assessment of the status of the plankton community in UK waters. Led by the University of Plymouth, scientists from all around the UK joined together to share their datasets and knowledge to fill in...

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  • Exploring the Effects of Climate Change on Marine Food Webs

    29th October 2019 by

    Three researchers (T. Regnier, F. M. Gibb and P. J. Wright) from Marine Scotland Science (MSS) have had their paper entitled “Understanding temperature effects on recruitment in the context of trophic mismatch” published in the journal Scientific Reports.  The paper looks to address the impacts of climate change in Scotland’s marine environment and fish stocks....

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  • Ocean Acidification and the Damage it can Cause

    21st October 2019 by

    Dr Pablo Leon Diaz, Plankton Ecologist in Marine Scotland Science, has just had a paper “Relationship between shell integrity of pelagic gastropods and carbonate chemistry parameters at a Scottish Coastal Observatory monitoring site” published in the ICES Journal of Marine Science. The paper presents the first investigation of the impacts of ocean acidification on shell-forming...

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  • Marine Scotland Contributes to International Publication on Ocean Acidification

    25th July 2019 by

    Concern is growing globally about the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine environment. OA results from a change in the carbonate chemistry of the ocean making it more acidic, primarily as a result of the increased uptake of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This increased acidity of seawater may negatively impact many marine...

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  • Coastal Temperature Data Published on World Oceans Day

    8th June 2019 by

    Map showing coastal monitoring stations

    As part of the Scottish Coastal Observatory, Marine Scotland and a group of dedicated volunteers record coastal water temperatures around Scotland. Today, on World Oceans Day, the coastal water temperature data from 14 monitoring locations are being published. The volunteer-based observing network works by the volunteers receiving a small self-recording temperature sensor every three months...

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  • Storm Frank Makes its Mark in SCObs Monitoring Data

    27th July 2018 by

    SCObs Team

    Aberdeen may be in the midst of a summer heatwave but scientists in Marine Scotland Science (MSS) have seen the footprint of Storm Frank while performing an in-depth quality check of data from the Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs) last week. Storm Frank impacted Scotland from 28th – 30th Dec 2015 bringing wide spread flooding and destruction...

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  • Scottish Ocean Climate Status Report 2016 published

    4th July 2018 by

    Current circulation map

    A new report by scientists in Marine Scotland that examines the variability and trends in the physical conditions of the seas around Scotland in the last decade and further into the past has been published. Describing the conditions in 2016, the most recent year for which a full dataset is available, the Scottish Ocean Climate Status report shows that...

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  • Opening the Doors on Coastal Monitoring

    12th September 2017 by

    Staff at Marine Scotland are busy preparing for Aberdeenshire Doors Open Day on the 16th September. Located in the courtyard of the Tollbooth Museum by Stonehaven harbour between 10am until 4pm, they will be presenting a display about the renowned Scottish Coastal Observatory site located 5km offshore from Stonehaven. For the last 20 years, environmental factors at sea such...

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  • SCObs Weekly Sampling to Expand at St Abbs

    7th April 2017 by

    Feature Image St Abbs Harbour

    The Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs) monitors the temperature, salinity, nutrients and plankton community at a number of sites around the Scottish coast. The efforts of Marine Scotland scientists are supported by a network of local citizen-scientists who deploy small temperature sensors and collect water samples for analysis. Many of the SCObs sites have been collecting...

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